Whose Sari Now?   Recently updated !


sariSometimes, a catchy headline draws you into an article, and you realize that you may have missed some interesting movements, which while are not publicized widely, could create an impact in the society.

One such article caught my attention while browsing – which brought to light the movement by some Indian women to bring back the Sari (or Saree) into an everyday wear garment for the Indian women worldwide – started interestingly enough in California!

She’s part of a movement of Indian women who are bringing back the everyday wear of the sari through the 100 Sari Pact, which claimed Dec. 21 as World Sari Day.

The pact required Appanna and others to wear 100 different saris throughout 2015. She did that, celebrating the wearing of her 100th sari at a Dec. 20 “sari party” at Amber Cellar & Lounge in Los Altos. She draped invitees with saris she made.

“I love the sari,” she said. “I feel anyone can wear it – size, age, race, social standing – no bar.”

The sari (also spelled “saree”) is a South Asian garment that dates back thousands of years. A drape of cloth ranging from 5 to 9 yards long, the sari is usually wrapped around the waist with one end draped over one of the shoulders. They come in a range of fabrics, colors and designs…”

Fascinating! Good luck to Archana and team – and remember, Silk Threads not only can provide you beautiful saris in a variety of designs fore all events – from parties to weddings, but can also provide you video training on how to tie a sari.